• Dispelling the AR Stigma

    How often have your patients turned down anti-reflective coatings due to a prior bad experience?

    Dr. Anne-Marie Lahr, HOYA Vision CareWelcome guest blogger Dr. Anne-Marie Lahr! Dr. Lahr is responsible for technical and medical education at HOYA Vision Care.

    As I work with accounts and directly with patients from time-to-time, I am still amazed at how many patients still grasp onto the memory of anti-reflective coatings of the past. Even as we tell them from the chair to the dispensing floor the importance of anti-reflective, there is still this underlying stigma that the coatings will separate, scratch or hold fingerprints and dirt.

    Here are a few ways we can begin to dispel and reverse these all too common feelings:

    1. Recognizing and understanding the deign flaws in old AR coatings

    2. How AR coatings, now called treatments, have changed

    3. Understanding why AR treatments are important to the effectiveness of today’s lens designs

    4. Helping patients understand the benefits of AR treatments

    The AR “Coating” Issue

    The anti-reflective coatings of the past had several design flaws that created a problematic issue for both dispensers and patients. Early coatings were not engineered to adhere to the hard coatings being applied to the lenses and this caused the pealing and crazing issues on most treated lenses. In addition, the porous nature of the early coatings would attract dust, dirt, water and oil particles to the surface of the lens which made the lenses not only difficult to clean, but created an environment where dirt easily penetrated the coatings surface to create scratches on the lens.

    Today’s Treatments

    Lens treatments of today are just that, lens treatments. They not only include the anti-reflective properties that are necessary for increased light transmission through the lens, but also include dirt, water, oil repellents and extreme scratch resistance. By creating glass-silicone substrates for the hard coats, we have been able to layer on treatments that adhere to the lens surface more efficiently. In addition, the super oleophobic and hydrophobic treatments allow your patient to easily and effectively clean their lenses.

    In the case of HOYA, we are not only creating the glass-silicone hard coat, but we are substrate matching the properties of the treatments to the index material type directly. Not only will the substrate expand and contract at the same rate as the lens, but the treatments will as well. This process also eliminates birefringence in the lens. Birefringence is the redirection of light through the lens due to mismatched properties creating an oily appearance to the lens. Because of these advancements, we are able to eliminate the birefringence issue while creating lenses that are as scratch resistant, if not more scratch resistant, than glass itself.

    One way to think about how today’s lens “treatments” are different than the “coatings” of the past is like this – A coating was essentially painted on top of the surface of the lens. Today, a treatment is baked into the lens and is therefore an inseparable part of the lens’s DNA.

    Importance of Treatments

    It is extremely important to note the necessity of AR treatments to the integrity of the lens design. Many of the new free form lenses on the market require anti-reflective treatments to maintain and enhance the lens design. Without these treatments, patients are not getting the full benefit of enhanced vision from their lenses.

    It is also necessary to remember that when a patient sits behind most phoropters for their eye exam, anti-reflective lenses are used. Your patient’s vision is therefore being determined with this treatment already on the lenses. By not including this treatment on their ophthalmic lenses, we are doing our patients a huge disservice. It is our responsibility as professionals to communicate this to our patients.

    Altering the Dialog

    The most effective way to educate our patients about the changes in eyewear designs and treatments is to alter the dialog. Again, we are dealing with “treatments” not coatings. These treatments are not just a “technical feature” they hold real value and patient benefits:

    1. Hydrophobic – Repels water

    2. Oleophobic – Repels oils, dirt and grime; easy to clean and keep clean.

    3. Anti-reflective – Allows in more light; greater comfort and reduced eye strain.

    4. Scratch resistance – Scratch protection which is the #1 desire among patients and protects their lens investment

    It is no longer just an anti-reflective lens. They are now all-inclusive lens treatments that enhance the design of the lenses. If we stop talking about anti-reflective coatings and start discussing “lens treatments”, the sale of these all important treatments will increase exponentially elevating the profit margin of the office as well. It is also important to keep this dialog simple. The patient doesn’t need to understand birefringence or substrate matching. All the patient wants to know is that the lens treatment will hold up against the elements, and that they won’t have to run into the office in six months for new lenses. As optical professionals, it is our job to provide the best wearing experience we can for our patients, and that experience includes a great lens treatment.

    Download a PDF of our current Super Hivision EX3 sales aid here for more details.

  • Dispelling the AR Stigma

    Research Shows More Than Half of Parents Feel ECPs Can Do More to Educate Children

    Dr. Anne-Marie Lahr, HOYA Vision CareWelcome guest blogger Dr. Anne-Marie Lahr! Dr. Lahr is responsible for technical and medical education at HOYA Vision Care.

    How often have your patients turned down anti-reflective coatings due to a bad experience they had in the past? As I work with accounts and directly with patients from time-to-time, I am still amazed at how many patients still grasp onto the memory of anti-reflective coatings of the past. Even as we tell them from the chair to the dispensing floor the importance of anti-reflective, there is still this underlying stigma that the coatings will separate, scratch or hold fingerprints and dirt.

    Here are a few ways we can begin to dispel and reverse these all too common feelings:

    1. Recognizing and understanding the deign flaws in old AR coatings

    2. How AR coatings, now called treatments, have changed

    3. Understanding why AR treatments are important to the effectiveness of today’s lens designs

    4. Helping patients understand the benefits of AR treatments

    The AR “Coating” Issue

    The anti-reflective coatings of the past had several design flaws that created a problematic issue for both dispensers and patients. Early coatings were not engineered to adhere to the hard coatings being applied to the lenses and this caused the pealing and crazing issues on most treated lenses. In addition, the porous nature of the early coatings would attract dust, dirt, water and oil particles to the surface of the lens which made the lenses not only difficult to clean, but created an environment where dirt easily penetrated the coatings surface to create scratches on the lens.

    Today’s Treatments

    Lens treatments of today are just that, lens treatments. They not only include the anti-reflective properties that are necessary for increased light transmission through the lens, but also include dirt, water, oil repellents and extreme scratch resistance. By creating glass-silicone substrates for the hard coats, we have been able to layer on treatments that adhere to the lens surface more efficiently. In addition, the super oleophobic and hydrophobic treatments allow your patient to easily and effectively clean their lenses.

    In the case of HOYA, we are not only creating the glass-silicone hard coat, but we are substrate matching the properties of the treatments to the index material type directly. Not only will the substrate expand and contract at the same rate as the lens, but the treatments will as well. This process also eliminates birefringence in the lens. Birefringence is the redirection of light through the lens due to mismatched properties creating an oily appearance to the lens. Because of these advancements, we are able to eliminate the birefringence issue while creating lenses that are as scratch resistant, if not more scratch resistant, than glass itself.

    One way to think about how today’s lens “treatments” are different than the “coatings” of the past is like this – A coating was essentially painted on top of the surface of the lens. Today, a treatment is baked into the lens and is therefore an inseparable part of the lens’s DNA.

    Importance of Treatments

    It is extremely important to note the necessity of AR treatments to the integrity of the lens design. Many of the new free form lenses on the market require anti-reflective treatments to maintain and enhance the lens design. Without these treatments, patients are not getting the full benefit of enhanced vision from their lenses.

    It is also necessary to remember that when a patient sits behind most phoropters for their eye exam, anti-reflective lenses are used. Your patient’s vision is therefore being determined with this treatment already on the lenses. By not including this treatment on their ophthalmic lenses, we are doing our patients a huge disservice. It is our responsibility as professionals to communicate this to our patients.

    Altering the Dialog

    The most effective way to educate our patients about the changes in eyewear designs and treatments is to alter the dialog. Again, we are dealing with “treatments” not coatings. These treatments are not just a “technical feature” they hold real value and patient benefits:

    1. Hydrophobic – Repels water

    2. Oleophobic – Repels oils, dirt and grime; easy to clean and keep clean.

    3. Anti-reflective – Allows in more light; greater comfort and reduced eye strain.

    4. Scratch resistance – Scratch protection which is the #1 desire among patients and protects their lens investment

    It is no longer just an anti-reflective lens. They are now all-inclusive lens treatments that enhance the design of the lenses. If we stop talking about anti-reflective coatings and start discussing “lens treatments”, the sale of these all important treatments will increase exponentially elevating the profit margin of the office as well. It is also important to keep this dialog simple. The patient doesn’t need to understand birefringence or substrate matching. All the patient wants to know is that the lens treatment will hold up against the elements, and that they won’t have to run into the office in six months for new lenses. As optical professionals, it is our job to provide the best wearing experience we can for our patients, and that experience includes a great lens treatment.

    Download a PDF of our current Super Hivision EX3 sales aid here for more details.

  • A Winning Strategy for Kids to Have Success with Their Glasses

    Research Shows More Than Half of Parents Feel ECPs Can Do More to Educate Children

    Dr. Anne-Marie Lahr, HOYA Vision CareWelcome guest blogger Dr. Anne-Marie Lahr! Dr. Lahr is responsible for technical and medical education at HOYA Vision Care.

    HOYA teamed up with PPG Industries to host a round table that in turn produced a study titled “Engaging with Today’s Parents to Promote Pediatric Vision”. We all know from raising or being around children that they need specific direction from authority figures. Parents can’t do it all alone and it is no different when it comes to their children’s eye health and instructions on the benefits and care of their glasses. The study summarizes many of the notions and conventional wisdom we all have in mind when it comes to kids and glasses. In addition you have a handy tool that offers strategic guidance and practical advice you can use to ensure your young patients are successful wearing their glasses.

    PPG HOYA PNX Kids white paperHere are a few highlights: - Only 41% of respondents said they were very satisfied with the amount of education their eyecare professional provided to their child on the proper way to care for their eyeglasses, suggesting that more than half felt their eyecare professionals could have done more.

    - When parents were asked to pick what was most important to them when deciding on a lens material for their child’s eyeglasses, about half felt that a combination of lens attributes (clearest vision, thinness, light weight, impact resistance and UV protection) was the most important.

    - OD panelists agreed that a combination of lens attributes such as comfortable/lightweight lenses were all factors that would increase the likelihood of children complying with wearing instructions. If kids are experiencing distortion or discomfort, they’re less likely to want to wear their glasses.

    - There has been a shift in attitudes among parents and kids over the past several years. For instance parents are much more aware of the connection between vision and learning and are seeking an edge for their children academically. Kids are also positively influenced by pop culture’s embrace of eyewear as a fashion statement, which has taken some of the stigma and fear away from wearing glasses.

    - Parents don’t always notice when eyeglasses are not being cared for properly, and would appreciate more education from their eyecare professionals in this area.

    Practical tactics you can use straight out of the study include:

    - Tips for bringing parents into the conversation

    - Data points regarding features and benefits parents are looking for in their kids’ glasses

    - Research summary on the connection between vision and learning

    - Key milestones checklist for infants

    - Best practices provided by panelists on how to present eyewear care and instructions

    - Principles for growing your kids-based practice

    The lens materials combined with frame styles available today make working with kids and their eyewear needs a little easier. However we all know the best patient is an educated patient – that goes for kids and their parents and caregivers as well. When you are armed with data, strategic direction and practical advice you have a world of opportunity and most importantly you set up your young patients to succeed!

    You are welcome to download a PDF of “Engaging with Today’s Parents to Promote Pediatric Vision” here .

  • Technological Advancements: Measuring Devices (Part 2 of 2)

    A Review of Spectangle and Optikam

    Guest Contributor: Leah Jones, HOYA Lens Brand Manager

    Spectangle from HOYADetermining the type of device to purchase really depends on which features you want the device to have, how automated you want your measurements to be and other bells and whistles you would like to have. Below is my review of the types of digital devices available. Please be sure to contact your local lab representative to review your options and the features of each device.

    Stationary Devices

    For several years, stationary measuring devices have been available. These units are generally priced from $8,000 to $14,000. These units are stationary and require a fixed location with adequate lighting for best use. In addition, the patient needs to be in the right position in front of the machine to capture usable images.

    Hand-held Devices

    The hand-held devices are new to the market in the past year. Utilizing tablets, such as iPads, these units are light-weight, mobile, and allow the patient a hands-on experience when experiencing augmented reality. On the optical floor, the optician can demonstrate lens thickness, lens treatments, lens designs and boundless other options that enhance the patient experience. Such devices have applications beyond the optical floor as well. Several companies have created videos that can be played for patients while sitting in the doctor’s chair that explain medical conditions such as glaucoma, AMD, and more. There are several hand-held devices on the market today. I wanted to provide a review of two of the devices that HOYA advocates: HOYA’s Spectangle and Optikam. Below, I have provided you with a comprehensive review of both of these devices.

    Spectangle:
    Spectangle is HOYA’s proprietary app that can be used on an iPad3. It is also one of the most economical measurement options on the market today. Created by Dr. Thomas Gosling, the app is meant to give you an affordable and comprehensive measuring tool. Using a lock-on kit provided only to HOYA accounts after purchasing Spectangle from the Apple App Store, the optician will take a series of four pictures for vertex distance, pantoscopic tilt, face form, and front facing for pd’s, seg heights, and frame box measurements. The optician then has the flexibility to manipulate measurements to meet the patient’s needs. In addition, the optician has the ability to enter all the data necessary for the MyStyle lens and then transmit the order directly to the lab. Combined with the Hoya HVC Viewer augmented reality application, also available in the Apple App Store, you will have an affordable measuring tool that will impress your patients. For demonstration and pricing, please contact your HOYA lab representative.

    Optikam:
    A strategic partner for HOYA, Optikam has created their own hand-held device. Using a case attachment for the iPad containing a high intensity flash and a frame attachment tool called an EY Stick, the device allows the optician to gather all the necessary measurements from just one picture. The device allows the optician to capture vertex distance, pantoscopic tilt, face form, pd’s, seg heights, and frame box measurements in one easy to capture picture.In addition, the application contains augmented reality tools, lens thickness demonstrators, and a frame comparison tool. Similar to Spectangle, the information needed for the MyStyle lens can also be transmitted directly from the device. As an added bonus, the Lens Selector tool shows the optician which lens styles can be used with the measurements provided. All-in-all, this is a very well-rounded tool. As with any tool that has all the “bells and whistles,”this device carries a significantly higher price tag than Spectangle. For more detailed information, please contact Optikam directly.

    Creating the Experience

    As my good friend, Tim Slapnicher of Rivertown Eyecare says, “We are creating an experience for the patient and involving the patient in the process rather than just doing it to them.” This concept of engaging the patient is even more important in today’s optical environment. Your patients interact daily with this type of technology and we have to as well if we want to create High Definition vision! These devices will help you achieve that goal and differentiate yourself from your competition.

    Your only goal as an optical professional should be to give your patients the best vision possible, and in return CREATE PATIENTS FOR LIFE! These devices will help pave the way to accomplishing that goal.

  • Technological Advancements: Measuring Devices (Part 1 of 2)

    The Impact of Technology on Our Business

    Leah Jones HOYA Brand RepresentativeGuest Contributor: Leah Jones, Hoya Lens Brand Manager

    I decided to write this article because I consistently get asked by my accounts whether I feel that measuring devices are necessary to our modern optical culture. Using a good old Minnesota colloquialism, “YOU BETCHA.” But seriously, our optical environment today is changing on a daily basis. At HOYA, we recognize the necessity for independent eye care professionals (ECP) to differentiate themselves in the market. In the sections to follow, I break down the issues, show you what is available, and outline the key factors that will allow you to select the right device for your office.

    The optical sales floor had been stagnant for many years relative to the devices available to assist us in our day-to-day tasks. Sure, they may vary slightly, such as the pupilometers that display a digital readout. However, for the most part, these devices are the same ones that we have been using for the past 30 years, and even PD rulers haven’t changed much. This does not mean the old methods are not effective. What it does mean, is that we are very far behind in a society that has traveled through the Information Age and into the Social Age. If you are not familiar with these times in history, we are currently in the Social Age. The Social Age encompasses both societal and technological changes leading out of the Information Age, which started with the advent of the personal computer in the 1970’s and culminated with the Internet reaching critical mass in the early 1990’s. Why this is important to the optical world is very simple; we are in a time when tablets, smart phones and, personal computers are common place. Cash registers and credit card swipers are things of the past and have been replaced with tablets and smart phones that can instantly transmit data. Standard tools such as date books, phone books, and maps have been replaced by devices which via the cloud, store more data than the first computers that took up entire rooms. Think about the technology we are surrounded by! Now think about our pupilometers, Sharpies, and PD rulers – are they are potentially underwhelming to our patients?

    Is the Same Old Way Good Enough?

    Besides patient perception we also have to consider theadded accuracy of these devices. Today’s highly technical lens designs, such as the MyStyle, can only truly benefit our patients if we fabricate the lens using as much accurate data as possible. We have entered a period in optical history where technological advancements in lenses have far exceeded our ability to accurately measure to the degree necessary to benefit entirely from these lenses. We can now process down to 1/100th of a diopter; however, we are still measuring PD’s in .5 mm increments and seg heights in full mm increments. By comparison, many of the computerized measuring devices I am advocating can measure to 1/10th of a mm in both seg heights and PD’s.

    As you begin working with these new measuring devices, it is a little like starting over as a new optician. It can be difficult to change something that we have been doing the same way for so many years. However, that doesn’t mean that we shouldn’t want to learn how to do things differently. Ourpatients are hearing about digital lenses and measuring devices from the chainstores. If you watch any amount of TV, you can’t help but notice Lens Crafters' advertisements for their ACCUFIT system. We have to face the fact that our patients are bombarded with far more advertising from the chain stores then they are from our private ECP offices. Do you not think that it is important to be able to at least offer the same level of experience and technology to our patients?

    This process in no way diminishes your ability or expertise as an optician. In fact, it enhances your abilities and accuracy. Now more than ever, it is so important to be able to troubleshoot a non-adapt situation. Retention of photos in these devices make this process quicker and more efficient. You can go back and review the patient’s position of wear, how they were holding their head, and whether head rotation occurred. These factors will help you accurately assess the situation quickly and efficiently.

    Benefits of Measurement Devices

    These devices offer additional tools that make our recommendations more visual for the patient. We no longer have to describe edge-to-edge clarity and lower swim factors; we can now show the patient what that means! Several of these devices are able to calculate lens thickness based on pupil placement in the frame and prescription. You can then show the patient the difference between CR-39, mid-index, and hi-index lens materials. Every device that I have worked with has also been able to demonstrate photochromic lenses, polarization, lens treatments, and several have augmented reality tools.

    The augmented reality tools allow your patient to utilize areal-world scenario to demonstrate the lens performance. There are evenaugmented reality tools that function like a viewfinder and the patient canlook around the room they are in and really see the differences among theavailable lens designs and treatments. All of us who have spent time on an optical floor struggle with how to effectively explain the utility of progressive lenses to our patients, and I know many who have a hard time upgrading the patient to free-form lenses because of price. However, when a patient can visually see the difference in an augmented reality situation, this upgrade becomes much simpler.

    Next week Part 2 will be posted and will include Leah's reviews of two popular measurement devices, Optikam and Spectangle.

  • Do your patients stay active patients? (Part 2 of 2).

    Practical Tips for Filling Your Schedule with Reactivated Patients

    amy lavange of solutionreachGuest Contributor: Amy LaVange of Solutionreach. Amy can be reached at amy@solutionreach.com.

    Amy LaVange from Solutionreach has returned as a guest blogger to share her practical knowledge for effectively using e-newsletters to reactivate dormant patients. Let’s dive in!

    What forum to use?

    Without question, your first choice for education should be e-newsletters. Sending information electronically allows you to link to external sources, as well as quickly direct patients to your blog, website or social media pages.

    Electronic newsletters are very effective for facilitating recall, especially if you are able to let them schedule or request an appointment either within the email, by responding to the email, or via a link to your website/social media page.

    *Tip* Be sure to always include your practice contact information within the body of the message. Most people read their email on a smart phone – your phone number and practice address will automatically become clickable, so patients can use them to quickly “click” and call, or plug your address into their phone’s navigation program.

    *Tip* Patients are more likely to read your emails if you catch them right in the beginning. Here are some ideas for creating winning subject lines.

    Other places to store your newsletters:

    Keeping digital copies of your newsletter and educational information on your website is a great way to become a resource that people can happen upon, as well as “like” or “share” (practice marketing!).

    If you’re using social media – which you should be – post the new content every time you release it, and keep albums in your FaceBook or Pinterest with the content sorted by category.

    If you’re blogging, each newsletter can be a blog post. When categorized correctly, your blog becomes yet another resource, encouraging recall and new patient generation.

    Hard copies of your newsletter should also be kept in your office, either laminated or within binders as a collection of information. Keeping the information in your waiting room will encourage patients to begin paying attention to your emails, as well as show them that you are engaged and dedicated to helping them maintain or achieve optimal vision health.

    How often is too often?

    If your content is valuable, you won’t have many patients asking to be taken off of your newsletter list. If your newsletters, (or social media content for that matter), are always focused on marketing your practice, patients are more likely to opt-out of emails. Making the content feel personalized, with an emphasis on education, keeps patients engaged and interested in reading.

    Sending a newsletter once a month is average – don’t send more than two per month, and be sure to send at least 4 per year.

  • Do You Have an Effective Patient Recall Plan?

    Do your patients stay active patients? (Part 1 of 2)

    amy lavange of solutionreachGuest Contributor: Amy LaVange of Solution Reach. Amy can be reached at amy@smilereminder.com.

    Maximizing your revenue by reactivating patients that you already have is much easier than attempting to fill your schedule with new ones. By incorporating education efforts into your recall plan, patient reactivation also becomes the most effective way to maintain a thriving practice.

    Engaging vision patients by providing information that is specific to their unique concerns or interests has many benefits, and a successful recall plan is just one of them.

    How Does Patient Education Affect Patient Recall?

    First, it instills loyalty and trust – you care. Patients are very often hesitant to ask questions when meeting with their provider. By being the educator you become the resource they look to and trust, encouraging discussion and enhancing the doctor-patient relationship. Patients who have relationships with their providers are much less likely to switch to a new one – even when distance, insurance or cost comes into play.

    Education outreach maintains communication – they expect to hear from you, because they have been receiving valuable – relationship maintaining – information since the last time they saw you. Later, when you let them know that it’s time to schedule an annual appointment, they see it as a gentle reminder instead of a sudden solicitation after 10 months of radio silence.

    Patient education also increases engagement – they don’t forget that they need you. By providing information that correlates to their vision care, they are thinking about their eyes.

    Topics, Topics, Topics

    Patients everywhere have turned into professionalresearchers – we love being able to diagnose our ownproblems, learn about our options, and carry this information in with us whenwe visit our provider. Bring the information to them! Here are some ideas:

    Vision and Eye Education

    “How Does the Eye Work?”

    “Stages of Infant Vision Development”

    “What Causes Double Vision?”

    Symptoms and Conditions

    “Symptoms of Glaucoma”

    “Signs of Eye and Vision Problems”

    “Headaches and Vision Problems”

    Vision Health Maintenance Topics

    “Help Your Child’s Vision Development”

    “How to Protect Your Eyes during Sports”

    “Good Nutrition for Healthy Eyes”

    Treatments and Procedures

    “LASIK 101”

    “How Do You Treat Lazy Eye?”

    “Glaucoma and GDx Testing”

    Common Questions

    “Is it Time for Reading Glasses?”

    “Is Your Child Ready for Contact Lenses?”

    “Help – the Neighbor Has Pinkeye!”

    Featured Products

    “HOYA Lenses – Why the Hype?”

    “Prescription Sunglasses?”

    “UV Protection from Contact Lenses”

    The topics listed here are sample topics from the library of pre-written articles that Solutionreach provides for their customers touse with their customizable newsletters, which is just one of the automatedpatient communication tools included in the Solutionreach platform.

    Next week we will post Part 2 of this article that will have practical tips and advice for maintaining excellent patient recall through your newsletter!

  • Three Things You Need to Know About Free Form Lens Quality Control

    An abstract to the whitepaper, “Understanding HOYA’s iD Lens Series Quality Card.”

    One - There Was a Time When Two Was Enough

    Cass plus screenIn past years, progressive lenses were produced using molded semi-finished blanks, and by surfacing spherical or toric surfaces onto the back of the lens. The design of the lens was incorporated into the molded lens blank at the factory, and the conformance of the molded progressive to the design was assured by inspecting the blanks during the lens casting process. After surfacing in the laboratory, the final Rx was verified by checking power at two points – the Distance and Near Verification circles. This process, which has been widely used since the introduction of progressive lenses, delivers predictable quality, and can be easily verified by ECP’s by use of a lensometer.

    Two – Free-Form Changes Everything

    image mapSince lenses produced using Hoya Free-Form processing techniques do not use factory molded surfaces, the laboratory that produces the lens must assume the entire role of quality assurance. HOYA Free-form quality assurance means more than verifying power in the Distance and Near Verification circles. The purpose of the HOYA inspection process is to guarantee the design integrity over the entire surface of the lens.

    Three – Not All Quality Control Processes Are the Same

    Other competing lens designs may use Free-Form surfacing techniques toproduce advanced curves and corrections, but many still only verify the lens atthe Distance and Near Verification circles, and do not make use of lensmapping. Unfortunately, there are manyproduction errors that could allow a lens to look within tolerance in those twoplaces, but fail to deliver the intended design at other places in thelens. In those cases, the fabricationprocess has failed to maintain the integrity of the design, and willdeliver a non-optimal visual experience to the patient.

    For more information about free form lens quality control processes you request a copy of the complete whitepaper by emailing us at info@hoyavision.com, or your local HOYA representative

  • Did you know...

    The Sun Has Done 80% of the Damage it Will Do to Your Eyes By Age 18!

    Professor MurrayThis post has been shared by guest blogger Professor Murray! You can follow Professor Murray on Twitter here.

    According to the EPA UV rays from the sun can cause a variety of eye health problems such as cataracts, pterygium, skin cancer around the eyes, and macula degeneration.

    CR39, unless specifically UV treated, does not provide the everyday eye glasses wearer enough UV protection.

    One option for eyeglasses wearers, especially children, is HOYA Phoenix®lens material. Phoenix lenses provide your wearers with 100% Ultra Violet absorption up to 395 nm already built in. For the three bands of UV here are the protection ranges from Phoenix lenses:

    UV-C UV-B UV-A
    100% 100% 100%
    up to 280 nm 280-315 nm 315-395 nm

    Phoenix and UV RaysHOYA Phoenix lenses are so incredibly light they nearly float on water. In addition they are very tough with the ability to resist 10kg of pressure and the tensile strength to withstand 130 to 180 pounds of pulling force making Phoenix a great alternative to polycarbonate.

    Be sure to consider the lens material that offers the best benefits for your eye health – HOYA Phoenix Lenses, light weight, safe and durable, plus UV ray protection from the sun.

    For more information about the benefits of HOYA Phoenix lenses visit our web site or find the HOYA provider near you or take a look at our patient brochure.

    Talk to your local independent eye care provider to learn more about the benefits of Phoenix lens materials and proper UV protection!

  • Are you in the market for new eye glasses?

    Do you know what you are buying?

    This post has been shared by guest blogger Lori Pace! Find out more about Lori and her blog, A Day in Motherhood.

    When we go to buy eyeglasses most of us think a lot about the style of the frame, however the really important part is the lenses, that’s what helps us see better!

    Lori Pace, Mommy Blogger Something I just learned is that lenses are made up of three parts – material, design, and treatment. Each part plays an important role in your comfort, the way you see and your overall happiness with your glasses. Studies show that most people want “light and thin glasses” and they want the lenses to be “scratch resistant.” Let’s look at how that happens!

    1. Lens Material = The material is the stuff the lens is made out of, typically some type of plastic since they don’t use glass anymore! You’ll hear the terms “high index” “poly carbonate” or “Trivex” and each has different benefits. The material used for your glasses depends on your prescription and your lifestyle as some materials aren’t appropriate for some prescriptions or ages.

    2. Lens Design = The design determines how the prescription is ground on to the lens material. Depending on what you need (progressive, single vision, bi focal, etc) the doctor will recommend a particular lens design. Some designs are old, some are new. You may hear the word “digital” and they’ll say that is the best and the latest. Not all digital designs are the same. The lens laboratory may use the digital equipment, but the software is telling the machine to put an old design on the lens material, sort of like building a record player at the iPod factory! So be sure to ask about the lens design.

    Certain designs are specific to a particular patient need. For instance you may remember our HOYA Twitter party when we discussed the Sync lens? Sync is a “lens design” and it is tailored to the needs of people who consume hours and hours of digital media.

    If you buy an expensive digital lens and they say it will be ready in an hour, be very suspicious! A good lens takes longer to make than an hour.

    3. Lens Treatment = Ten years ago they didn’t have “treatments” it was called an “anti-glare coating.” And if you remember coatings from back then they weren’t very good. As the word “coating” implies it is a cover and it can come off! Today the technology is much different and the benefits of anti-reflection, anti-glare, and scratch resistance are “baked” into the lenses, therefore the word “treatment” is used and what you’re buying is much more durable.

    Different treatments have different benefits. I hosted a Twitter Party in April where we talked about Recharge, a lens treatment from HOYA. The neat benefit with Recharge is it reflects blue light from your smart phone and tablet that can cause eye fatigue, blurred vision and headaches associated with Computer Vision Syndrome.

    You’re buying a lot of stuff when you buy eyeglass lenses! Your local independent eye care provider will generally spend the time necessary to explain everything. Especially since the lenses in your eyeglasses are really a medical device and can be expensive. No matter where you go it’s important to ask questions about the lens materials, design and treatment. After all it is your vision!

  • Amblyopia Study

    Quality Innovation, Patient-centered Service & Responsible Altruism

    Guest Contributor: Katherine K. (Niemann) Weise, OD, MBA, FAAO

    Director, Pediatric Optometry Service Supervisor,

    Pediatric Optometry Residency University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Optometry

    I have enjoyed using HOYA products my whole working career, but have more recently come to appreciate most HOYA's Phoenix lenses, along with the combination of Transitions and Super HiVision EX3 anti-reflective treatment--most especially for kids.

    Several years ago, I spoke at a continuing education event on the most evidenced-based, up-to-date ways to treat amblyopia based on our participation in the Pediatric Eye Disease Investigator Group (PEDIG) research studies. HOYA and Randy Snuggs, our long-time, dedicated HOYA representative, were kind enough to sponsor the CE event. It seemed as though he was just as interested in learning the most innovative ways to treat amblyopia as the other attendees were, hoping to share what he learned with others who use HOYA products and also listening intently to see how HOYA could help us. What I learned from Randy that night was that HOYA's Phoenix lens was more shatter-resistant than polycarbonate, was thinner and lighter, and had far fewer aberrations. The possibility that I could also upgrade to Transitions and/or Super HiVision EX3 ARC seemed like icing on the cake for my young patients, especially those trying to "fit in" with glasses. That evening, it became instantly clear to me that HOYA's products were perfect for any child, but especially those with myopia or an isometropic amblyopia. The products could potentially increase a child's spectacle wear time simply by making them feel more comfortable, visually and physically, and by helping them see more clearly. The added safety of the Phoenix lens for those with high myopia at risk for retinal detachment with trauma and for those who have poor vision in one eye related to amblyopia seemed crucial.

    Shortly thereafter, I actively discussed them with patients in my private practice setting. However, through continued discussions with Randy, I soon learned that HOYA not only offered superior products for my youngest patients, but also that HOYA is dedicated to supporting research in clinical settings if it means making a difference in a child's life.

    And that it has! Since those early days, we've enrolled several children who have anisometropic amblyopia into glasses for the first time, some with terrible vision in one eye and needing every ounce of protection they can get. It is amazing to see the smiles on the child's face the very second they put the glasses on for the first time. It was also amazing to see the difference between the polycarbonate pairs of lenses and the HOYA lenses (Phoenix lenses and Super HiVision EX3 ARC)!

    I had my staff re-measure the prescription glasses because it was hard to believe that the same prescription in polycarbonate could look so much thinner and lighter and cleaner with the Phoenix lenses. I suspect the much-needed wear-time is maximized because of the great qualities of the HOYA products, which maximizes the prognosis of a child with amblyopia.

    The value that HOYA brings to our office based on quality products is great. HOYA makes us look innovative. The value that HOYA brings to our office by supporting our research, by not only helping that single child, but all those who come after we learn the answers to our research questions is amazing. HOYA wants to give back and makes us look smarter. The value that HOYA brings to the lives of each smiling child is priceless. I look forward to learning what HOYA will do next!

  • Super HiVision EX3

    You Too Can Have Super Powers!

    You’re throwing breakfast at the kids, packing lunches and running around like a chicken without a head. You’re so close to getting out the door when you notice there is no way your son can possibly see out of those glasses. Dirt and smudges are all over and you just noticed a new scratch right down the middle of one lens. Not good.

    This is a pretty typical scene for parents of children with glasses. But it doesn't have to be this way anymore because now you can have a super power!

    Super HiVision EX3 is a lens treatment that offers the most scratch resistance available today. Many people don’t know that glass, the original spectacle lens material, is incredibly scratch resistant. Glass can be very heavy and today almost 99% of spectacle lenses are made from a variety of plastics which unfortunately scratch more easily. Combine that with kids being particularly rough glasses wearers and parents can get very frustrated.

    Super HiVision EX3, developed by HOYA, is more scratch resistant than glass – a definite super power for your kids’ lenses. EX3 has these additional super power properties:

       

    2012 SHV EX3 Patient Brochure
    • Fingerprints! Grease! Dirt! – They can all be removed in just a few wipes reducing wear and tear on your lenses.
    • Durable Long-Lasting Treatment – Easy-to-clean properties remain intact even after long-term use and repeated wiping.
    • Sports and Hobbies – Protection during rough games or times of deep concentration.
    • Water Slides Right Off – The treatment properties of EX 3 shield lenses from rain, snow and water fountain mishaps.
    • Reduced Eyestrain – Less eye fatigue in artificial lighting and varied light conditions.

    All of these benefits help provide maximum protection against daily wear and tear extending the life of your kids’ lenses and maximizing your lens investment. Ask your eye care professional about how you can get a super power with Super HiVision EX3 today.

    For the eye care professional near you that provides lenses with Super HiVision EX3 go to www.hoyavision.com/provider today!

  • Recharge

    Our eyes were designed for us to use as hunters and gatherers. Now we hunt and gather on Google! We are not fully equipped to handle all of the demands placed on our eyes by today’s technological devices.

    We are a society seeking efficiency and convenience. However the very devices that bring those benefits have a downside, especially eye fatigue. The eye has a muscle, called the Ciliary, that tenses up as it tries to focus on back-lit screens, hour after hour. When this muscle locks up it causes a variety of uncomfortable symptoms.

    By reducing the amount of blue light that enters the eye, patients will be able to increase their comfort level and reduce eye fatigue, headaches, blurred vision and other related discomfort that can hamper the efficiency we use our smart phones and tablets for in the first place!”

    Several studies as well as data from OSHA and ISO, all show there are hazards associated with the High Energy Visible (HEV) Blue Light portion of the light spectrum. Blue light, including HEV Blue Light, is emitted from hand-held devices such as smart phones and tablets. Symptoms as diverse as sleep disorders in children and adolescents, headaches, blurred vision, and fatigue can be due to exposure to blue light radiating from hand-held digital equipment.

    Within the visible light spectrum there is “good blue light” and “bad blue blight.” The good blue light helps our body’s biorhythms and sleep patterns. While overexposure to the HEV, or “bad blue light,” attacks us with a wide range of annoying and chronic conditions associated with Computer Vision Syndrome (CVS) and Digital Eye Strain (DES).

    HOYA has developed and launched RechargeTM, an anti-reflective lens treatment that reflects the harmful Blue Light away from the eyes. HOYA’s new Recharge anti-reflective treatment reflects the portion of blue light emitted from back-lit hand held devices that is “bad” and ensures the portion of blue light we need for optimal contrast and other health benefits is allowed to pass through. In a sign of our times, studies show many children, and people in their 20s who grew up with hand-held devices as part of their lives, are spending as much as half their day staring at a screen barely an arm’s length away. This generation is most certainly overexposed to blue light emitted from their smart phones and tablets and suffering unnecessarily from fatigue.

    Independent eye care professionals know the questions to ask and have access to solutions like Recharge to help their patients cope with fatigue and other symptoms associated with Computer Vision Syndrome.

    Join us for conversation about Recharge and other optical solutions that are available to you and your family from independent eye care providers that offer HOYA eye glass lens products.

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